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A guilt-free holiday

Montenegro presents carbon-neutral tourism

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Montenegro is an ideal destination for fans of wild beauty. This small Western Balkan country is not only rich in nature, but also has deep historical roots.

Tourists visiting Montenegro often report back on the country’s fresh air, clean water and unspoiled landscapes and seascapes. Its pristine nature, combined with rich culture, tradition and history, works like a charm on tourists looking for escape.

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Whether you're taking a stroll around the old pirate town of Ulcinj or the relaxing marina of Bar, attending beach parties, or the film and music festivals of Budva or exploring the historical Herceg Novi, there is something in Montenegro for everyone.

Kotor Bay, Montenegro
New and improved bike routes all across the country are seeing a lot of interest from tourists and locals alike.
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With UNDP support, music festivals across the country are going green.

THE DOWNSIDE OF TOURISM

But the riches of Montenegro are only one side of the story.

An average tourist visiting Montenegro emits 6.5 kg of carbon-dioxide equivalent per day, also known as their carbon footprint.

Put thousands of tourists together and any tourist destination is immediately at risk of being spoiled. Even though the economy may benefit in the short-term, if local riches are damaged or destroyed, they will no longer be available in the long-term.

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MUSIC CAN BE GREEN, TOO

That's where UNDP in Montenegro and the GEF decided to step in.

To begin with, they have developed new bike routes and improved existing ones. The newly re-opened one in the village of Kameno offers 7.5 kilometres of inland routes with unspoiled countryside, gently rolling hills and rural roads.

UNDP has also partnered with festivals across the country to go completely green. So far, the Lake Fest, Bedem Fest, and Southern Sol Fest - which are some of the main music events in Montenegro - have jumped on board to ensure festivals remain kind to the planet.


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LOW ON BATTERY? DON'T SWEAT IT

Another major initiative has been the installation of smart solar benches throughout Montenegro.

This new urban furniture doubles as charging stations for phones. But it also offers useful data, monitoring air quality in the environment with built-in sensors. Data on the levels of carbon dioxide, noise, temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure are available to anyone via the Strawberry mobile applications in real time.

Visitors arriving at Podgorica Airport have the opportunity to join the low-carbon movement in Montenegro.
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THE FUTURE IS CARBOn-NEUTRAL

UNDP in Montenegro has also developed a web-based carbon calculator for tourists who want to help. When you're traveling to Montenegro, you can use the calculator to measure the environmental impact of your stay and of the mode of transport (land/sea/air) you use.

When you calculate and then compensate your emissions, you become a member of the low-carbon movement in Montenegro, helping raise the country's profile as a green destination and contributing to global climate action.

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Montenegro's potential for developing carbon-neutral tourism is immense. That's why UNDP is working with local authorities to create a sustainable urban mobility plan for Boka Kotorska Bay and the old Royal Cetinje. The plan is to ensure the urban transport system not only remains accessible, secure and clean but also doesn't harm the environment.

We've done our part. Now there's only one thing missing: you!

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Towards Carbon Neutral Tourism in Montenegro is a GEF funded project implemented by UNDP in Montenegro and the Ministry for Sustainable Development and Tourism of Montenegro.

Footnote: Photos by UNDP in Montenegro/Risto Bozovic, http://www.photographer.its.me
Montenegro